Vaporizing presents minimal risk of second-hand exposure

 In Archive, Archive 2016, Update

Hospital staff or researchers are at low risk of exposure to patient’s exhaled cannabis vapour. An Australian study demonstrated staff who administer vaporized cannabinoid medication to patients in a clinical environment will not be exposed to THC. The active substance THC was not found in the blood after staff had been exposed to environmental vapours.

A vaporizer medical device is considered to be a safe administration method for patients. There is no exposure to harmful substances like from smoking. The medicinal effects occur sooner with vaporizing than with other administration forms, because the cannabinoids are absorbed into the blood almost immediately after inhalation. It is also a user-friendly method for patients who struggle with swallowing. However, until recently there was little or no knowledge of whether the exhaled vapour would be harmful to other people in the same environment. In other words, could someone else be exposed to THC?

The conclusion is therefore that vaporizing is safe for staff who administer medicinal cannabis to patients. However, a more comprehensive study of this subject is warranted. A study including more participants, room sizes, cannabis varieties, and types of vaporizers would be beneficial.

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